What Lean and Six Sigma CAN’T Do

By now, you have probably realized that I am a process innovation nut.  I must have a mutated gene, for I see everything in life as a process – a series of steps marching to a rhythm and flow toward some objective.  Tools such as Lean and Six Sigma serve as lenses through which I view my surroundings.  When I go to a restaurant, I calculate the number of steps taken by the waiter.  Then determine which of those are value-adding and value-robbing.  I spend dinner time trying to figure out a more efficient pattern and route the waiter could take to maximize his or her table turns.

In recent months, I’ve noticed, my experiences do not always fall so neatly into my highly pragmatic internal classification and problem-solving framework.  I battle with questions like – Why are the chicks at Chik-fil-A so freaking friendly?  Why does Apple call their tech support the “Genius Bar” and Best Buy calls theirs “Geek Squad”?  Why is Disney World the “happiest place on earth” and the Denbigh Wal-Mart the eighth level of Hell?

Several months ago, I was introduced to Jake Poore and Integrated Loyalty Systems. Jake preaches a new process gospel – the excellent customer experience.  (I am trying to reconcile his concepts with the Lean and Six Sigma concepts into a nice, neat little philosophical package.)  Jake espouses two tools useful in evaluating the customer experience.  1) The Customer Compass – understanding the Needs, Emotions, Stereotypes, and Wishes of the customer (Get it!?  N-E-S-W, like on a compass).  2) The Touchpoint Map – dissecting the customer experience in light of the customer’s compass.  These add a dimension to process improvement that Lean and Six Sigma totally neglect.  Jake’s system addresses feelings, a topic I am not generally comfortable discussing.  I am, however, learning to place more and more significance, not just on how processes benefit the consumer intellectually, but how those processes make the consumer feel.  And research shows that we make purchases based on how and what we feel.

Lean and Six Sigma guide us in assembling the nuts and bolts of our business.  They identify the operational details, parsing waste from value.  But, they don’t force us to emotionally connect to with our customers.  While we invest a ton of resources in gaining efficiency, how much do we invest in creating relationship-based loyalty?  I would propose that if process innovation, improvement, and control form the foundation of the “house of quality,” then the customer’s experience is the lawn, front door, exterior, furniture, widows, and kitchen sink.

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2 Comments

  1. Sebastien Beausoleil

     /  December 5, 2010

    Do the customer is ready to pay for a relationship based on loyalty? in some case , yes, so it becomes value added to your product or service, no?

    Reply
  2. Thanks for the feedback, Sebastian.
    In lean training, we tend to consider the customer’s time and product quality as the key driver of value. This is the first time I have seen the tools to systematically assess and improve the customer’s emotional response. Yes, loyalty is value added, but one that is very difficult to include in the conventional lean tools. Now that I’m in a more service related industry, this becomes even a larger consideration.

    Reply

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